Wednesday, October 22, 2014

Waste Not...


        Lethal injections in Oklahoma are considered the most humane way to dispose of evil-doers. 
In both centuries before, we hanged bad guys (and gals) in Oklahoma, or used firing squads. Later we invented and used an electric chair, affectionately dubbed by the press, “Old Sparky.” 
Eventually, however, as media coverage expanded and taxpayers began to feel personally responsible for executions, we decided capital punishment would be more humane if we restrained a miscreant and injected chemicals to snuff him or her. 
The Bible says we are to put habitual evil-doers “away from us.” Death, of course, is the ultimate putting away.
As a newspaper reporter, I covered several trials of people who were accused of and proven to have committed unspeakable atrocities against fellow human beings. 
Once in private, after a devout Christian judge pronounced the death sentence, I asked if speaking those words troubled him? He said, “Not at all.” 
The convicted man had murdered––mostly women––on more than one occasion. Twice the man convinced juries that he was insane at the time he committed those acts. Twice jurors ordered him committed to the state department of mental health. When he had completed treatment and his sanity pronounced restored, he returned to society where he murdered yet another female. The trial I covered was for his third. Again he went with the tried and true insanity plea. The third time, however, was not a charm.
Several of the people on Oklahoma’s death row are strong physical specimens. It occurred to me that ailing folks outside might benefit from those healthy retinas, tissue, hearts, lungs, livers, etc. Poisoning a whole person seemed wasteful. 
I didn’t mention my idea to anyone else at first, afraid the theory might sound Frankenstein-ian. However, the more I thought about it, the better the idea seemed. Killing a healthy, physically viable sociopath was like throwing out the baby with the bathwater. 
I theorized some with law enforcement, all of whom scowled. After thinking it over, some said a lethal injection destroys organs and probably renders other parts unusable. One thoughtful fellow mused that, on the other hand, harvesting organs from a living donor probably would be illegal. 
When an Oklahoma inmate did not die on the table immediately after receiving the lethal injection (in April 2014), some suggested we return to one of our prior methods of capital punishment. Hanging would leave most organs and living tissue usable. A firing squad or "Sparky," probably not so much. 
My writer’s imagination began plotting a story in which a personable, handsome murderer fell in love with a lovely, naive young lawyer, and she with him.
That mental maneuvering created JINGO STREET, my eleventh published novel released by Oak Tree Press in August. 
This novel introduces Max Marco, 36, who murdered his first man when he was eight years old. Growing up in foster care and institutions, Max was a product of society’s answer to unwanted children. 
Attorney Anne Krease, 22, grew up like a hothouse orchid, protected, sheltered, and naive.
Under normal circumstances, these two should never have met. When they do, however, the chemistry between them is volatile. Tempestuous. Turbulent. 
Writers read the same news stories everyone else does. We process them differently. 
        JINGO STREET is a product of reality and my imaginings.    ––Sharon Ervin

Friday, October 17, 2014

WEEKLY ROUND-UP FOR OCTOBER 17, 2014

Welcome to the Weekly Round-Up everyone! Thank you for dropping in. Oak Tree Press has lots of news in our corral today. Be sure to check out our website, www.ShopOTPbooks.com, for a complete list of all the great books we have available. But now, for your reading pleasure, our authors have news, book signings, events, reviews, blogs and more to share with you as we head into the Round-Up…

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NEW COVER CONTEST!!
Do you think your cover is the best? 
Would you like to enter it into a contest for only $10.00? 
We would love for our OTP authors to enter their covers. The link to enter is:

If you would like us to enter your cover for you, we would be happy to and then bill you for the entry fee. Please contact JEANA at bookpromodept@aol.com


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JEANA LOMPREZ, OTP Public Relations Manager, has hooked up with Manic Readers to spotlight several OTP books. These sample chapters will be updated frequently and new releases will also be featured. 
Need help choosing a great book to read? Check out our sample chapters we have plenty to choose from.... Click on the title and you will be directed to a free read!

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NANCY LI PETRI is proud to announce "The Wooded Path” is close to completion!
She will be celebrating her launch with friends and neighbors dancing under the disco ball at a costume party at her home in Mooresville, NC, on Saturday night, October 25th. 

Ever wonder if you’re normal? Laine McClelland sure does. When the mysterious disappearance of a bunco friend, Paula, shakes her Lake Norman neighborhood, her seemingly perfect world is suddenly filled with dark thoughts, dangerous temptations and surprising confessions. What is normal once you realize life’s short, anyway? Was her marriage ever enough? She finds herself risking it all…and afraid of what really happened to Paula.

Author ANNE SCHROEDER says "...Nancy's "The Wooded Path" is an edgy, thoughtful treatment of issues facing married women today, including friendships, self-growth and marital fidelity. An unflinching portrayal of women I felt I knew... clever dialogue, and lots of real life issues pepper the page and make this a must-read for women struggling with middle age itch, the need for meaningful friendship bonds and the illusion that the marital grass is greener outside..."   

Author JOHN WILLS says "...it would make a great made for TV movie."

Author JANET GREGER says "...The author’s stream of consciousness account of Laine’s quandary about the direction of the rest of her life, particularly her love life, reveals a lot about marriage and relationships in modern suburban neighborhoods..."
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CAROL ALEXANDER, author of “The Big Squeal” is back from MISS LIBERTY’s month-long book tour. Pictured here, during a book signing, is a young book lover sipping from one of MISS LIBERTY’s keepsake beverage mugs.

A program and book signing for "The Big Squeal" by Liberty the Pig was held recently at the Boston Athenaeum, founded in 1807. One of the oldest independent libraries in the U.S., the prestigious Athenaeum is a private membership and research library. Adorned by a pair of red doors, the brick structure houses a vast collection of books and art work. 

“As told to author" CAROL ALEXANDER presented a program on her true heartland of America story in the great room, where many famous authors have spoken. The audience consisted of parents who belong to the library and their children from infants to grade school age. Donuts were served afterward, followed by a book signing in the children's library.

"This was an honor for Oak Tree Books," CAROL said, and for our town of Taylorville, IL. To have “The Big Squeal” share shelf space with some of history's greatest writers is humbling and exhilarating."

Childen's Librarian Suzanne Terry extended an invitation after CAROL made an inquiry by phone. Mrs. Terry clicked on the book's Amazon.com site during the phone call and was charmed by the pages she viewed. "We are so grateful to Mrs. Terry for this great opportunity," CAROL said. "I encourage other writers to follow their seemingly impossible dreams. Miracles do happen. As always, I credit OTP Publisher BILLIE JOHNSON for the gingham and flowers cover, which makes a fabulous first impression."

I choose "The Big Squeal" as my Featured Book of the Week for this prestigious honor!


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UPCOMING EVENTS

BERYL REICHENBERG, OTP children's book author, will have several book forms on display in a group show at the Paso Robles Library on October 2 running through the end of October. Her art piece, Hanging Book 3, continues to be displayed at the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art until the middle of October. 





AMY BENNETT, author of “End of the Road” and “No Lifeguard on Duty” will be at the Open House for the Alamogordo Public Library (Alamogordo, NM) on October 18 at 1:00 pm where she will be giving a book talk and signing her books. And just brought to my attention is that AMY’s books have gotten 29 Five-Star Reviews on amazon.com! Wow!






MARILYN MEREDITH, author of “Murder in the Worst Degree” will be at the Great Valley Bookfest on Saturday October 18 from 10:00 – 4:00 pm. The Bookfest is located at the Orchard Valley Shopping Center in Mateca, CA. MARILYN will be on Stage A at 2:00 pm talking about writing two mystery series.

On Saturday, October 25, from 1:00 – 4:00 pm, MARILYN will be participating with the Central Coast Sisters in Crime on a panel about the age of E-Publishing at the Atascadero Library in Atascadero.



VIRGIL ALEXANDER, author of “Saints and Sinners” will be signing books at the Bullion Plaza Museum in Miami, AZ during the Miami High School Class of '64 fiftieth reunion on Sunday, October 19 from 1:00 – 3:00 pm.








JOHN M. WILLS, author of “Healer” will be signing copies of his books at the St. Matthew Catholic Church in Spotsylvania, VA on October 19 from noon – 3:00 pm. 


The Year Without Christmas” has been selected as the November book of the month by the St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception parish book club! 


On Monday, November 17, at 10:00 am, JOHN will be the guest speaker at the monthly meeting of the Council of Catholic Women held at St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception parish in Fredericksburg, VA.




TEKLA DENNISON MILLER, author of “Mother Rabbit,” will be a member of a 3 person panel presenting for the Life Long Learning Lecture Series at Fort Lewis College, Durango CO on October 30 at 7:00 pm. They will explore artworks inspired by Sr. Helen Prejean’s book Dead Man Walking.  Panelists include Charissa Chiaravalotti and Dennis Elkins. TEKLA will comment on the film, and journalist and music critic Judith Reynolds, will chair the panel and focus on the opera.

On November 12, TEKLA will be the guest author at the TWRAHS book group reviewing “Mother Rabbit.” The event will be hosted by Connie Jacobs, Durango, CO

TEKLA was recently featured in Female First Magazine. Read the article here: http://www.femalefirst.co.uk/books/mother-rabbit-tekla-dennison-miller-545747.html


ANN K. HOWLEY, author of “Confessions of a Do-Gooder Gone Bad” will be the featured speaker for the Peters Township Referrals group at their event at the Sharp Edge Brasserie in McMurray, PA on November 6 at 5:00 pm. Her presentation is called "Write a Memoir - and Try Not to Laugh." She will also be selling and signing books at this event.







THONIE HEVRON, author of “Intent to Hold” and "By Force or Fear" will be speaking to the Rohnert Park Rotary about the Writers Life on November 11







KEN OXMAN, author of “Reluctant Assassin” will have a book signing at Barret Bookstore in Darien, CT on November 29. In December, Barnes & Noble in Norwalk, CT will have KEN come and speak at their Christmas Book Fair.  Ken is pictured here at his book signing at Barnes and Noble.








MARY MONTAGUE SIKES, author of "Jungle Jeopardy" is one of two visiting artists at New Town Art Gallery in Williamsburg, VA. During September, October and November, she will display her novels and the coffee table book, “Hotels to Remember,” in addition to her paintings. http://www.newtownartgallery.com/galleryevents/index.htm







BLOG CORRAL

LORNA COLLINS, author of “Ghost Writer” blogs this week about her Grandma’s powder box. Find out why it was so special to LORNA. http://lornacollins-author.blogspot.com/









DAC CROSSLEY, author of the Border Trilogy, is recovering from a head cold and he finds himself inspired to view its positive attributes. www.daccrossley.typepad.com.









SHARON ARTHUR MOORE, author of the culinary mystery, “Mission Impastable” has several blogging events and more to share this week.


SHARON is speaking at the Tucson Sisters in Crime meeting this Saturday. Her topic is: “The Plot Thickens when Well-Mixed” about plotting strategies.

She wrote a book review of a biography on Anne Mansfield Sullivan Macy http://writeonsisters.com/book-reviews/what-were-reading-biography-and-autobiography/

The winner of the contest to see what book Sharon will write next month for National Novel Writing Month was Potluck, the third book in her culinary mystery series. People read four options and voted for their favorite at http://writeonsisters.com/writing-craft/my-9-step-planning-process-for-nanowrimo-im-in-are-you/

In her continuing series at WriteonSisters.com about how to write the subgenres in mystery, she posted how to write a “cozy mystery” by following 16 steps. http://writeonsisters.com/writing-craft/the-mystery-of-mysteries-16-steps-to-writing-the-cozy-mystery/

In a related post, for those wanting to write a “culinary cozy mystery”, she provides 17 steps to get there. http://sharonarthurmoore.blogspot.com/2014/10/17-steps-to-writing-culinary-mysteries.html

SHARON takes on the on-going plotter/pantser debate. If it works for you, who cares? It’s a false dichotomy anyway. http://angelicafrench.blogspot.com/2014/10/plotter-vs-pantser-specious-distinction.html


That wraps up the Round-Up for this week. I hope everyone enjoys the Weekly Round-Up as much as I enjoy posting it for you. 

As always, if you have something you would like to submit to the Round-Up, send me an email at otpoffice@aol.com. 

Big or small, old or new. I would like to keep our corral full of news! Comments, questions or suggestions are welcome too.

Have a great weekend, everyone!! ~ Suzi 

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The Best Writing Class I Ever Took



Writers are always looking for the “golden key” to the door leading to their future as a best-selling author or award-winning novelist. They take classes and buy books on how to create memorable characters, how to write realistic dialogue, how to create compelling settings, and how to develop an intriguing and original plots (let's stop here for a minute: if anyone offers you a way to come up with an “original” plot for a certain number of dollars, I can find you a better deal on beachfront property next to a ski slope in Alamogordo, New Mexico. Guaranteed.)

 

And, of course, there is the ever-popular “How to get published” books and classes, guaranteed to make an aspiring writer part with their money. The advice ranges from getting an agent (how easy is that??) to a list of websites offering “free” self-publishing deals. And yet, despite all the preparation and promise, many writers fail to find the key that opens the door. Because a writer may get published; they may have a book in hand; they may be able to list it on amazon.com.

 

But all that doesn't make it them a good writer. And it doesn't mean they wrote a good book.

 

The best writing classes I ever took were way back in the late '70s and '80s. I'll do the math for you... I was in junior high and high school. I had two English teachers, Mrs. Quinn and Mrs. Hollis, that taught that writing was a process that involved, first and foremost, good spelling, followed closely by good grammar.

 

Yes, I had teachers that gave us spelling tests every week that not only demanded correct spelling but also wanted the definition of several words on the tests (fifty words a week, twenty definitions... do I have to mention this was Catholic school?) They also expected their students to know how to diagram sentences—and if I have to explain what that is, that tells you all you need to know about how tough these teachers were. Diagramming involved knowing the parts of speech and how they function in a sentence. I'm not sure I can still diagram the preceding sentence, but I can guarantee it is grammatically correct.

 

And what does that all have to do with writing? It has to do with not having an editor or reviewer cringe when they come across glaring misspellings (not typos, misspellings) and misused words in an otherwise interesting story (my personal favorite: I reviewed a book where the character, who happened to be a fisherman, waited for some news “with baited breath”. I had to take a ten-minute timeout from reading to recover enough to go on!) A writer can't count on the patience and good humor of an editor to excuse every spelling error they encounter. I can say from personal experience that nothing is more tiring and irritating than to try to read a story (or facebook posting) that is rife with spelling erros.

 

Good grammar is another skill that seems to have fallen into disuse. In some instances, when writing creatively, it's perfectly acceptable to dispense with some grammar rules. This is especially true when writing dialogue and the character speaking isn't particularly well-educated or is affecting a “street” toughness. There has also been an inexplicable overabundance of unnecessary apostrophes appearing everywhere (even on professionally printed signs and ads), where almost every word ending with the letter “s” must have an apostrophe in it.

 

Ever since my first two mystery novels in my Black Horse Campground series have been published, I've been asked by many aspiring writers about how to get published. I always answer that these days, just “getting published” is a piece of cake; what's harder to do is to become a good writer. And in order to do that, I always recommend at least auditing a course on basic English grammar at their local community college. I always get rewarded with puzzled looks or suspicion that I'm not being totally honest, that I'm keeping the secret to myself.

 

No, the key is there for whoever wants to use it. It just requires hard work and a real desire to learn what good writing really is. It's no guarantee of a publishing contract, but it's a definite guarantee of much improved writing skills. And that is what a writer—any writer—should desire more than anything.

 


Thursday, October 16, 2014

THE PERILS OF WRITING by Jackie Taylor Zortman


All of us who are authors know that getting published is a long, grueling process requiring weeks of full days staring at a computer monitor.  As we write, rewrite and endlessly read our work to edit and polish it, it takes a toll on our eyes, though we probably do not notice it.  Then along comes the editor with their super powers to find things we missed, even though we've read it 16 times, and those corrections demand more time on the computer.

Finally, we send our submission off to the publisher and back comes the task of the long-range marketing plan.  Yep, more time reading research and writing our actual LRMP, which means more deep gazing into the lights of our computer's screen.

If we get lucky, once that's accomplished, our manuscript is accepted and pretty soon we have galley proofs to read.  This is when the real work begins because we are under the gun and virtually tied to the tools of our trade.

A chiropractor once told me that computers are the worst thing for the human body that was ever invented. For example, I have severe neck arthritis from a fall down basement stairs 50 years ago, so have to sit on my big exercise ball when I write.

However, my greatest challenge recently appeared when my always crystal clear close vision suddenly went blurred one morning and remains that way.  Since I am in my 70s and have never had to wear glasses to read or write, I hopped in the car and saw the ophthalmologist right away.  He found nothing wrong with either my vision or my eyes.  His diagnosis is that my eyes have been abused, over-used with reading and writing too much on the computer, they are dry and they need rest because they are super tired.  I am not supposed to read, write or do much on the computer for three weeks until I go back to him for dilation and a more in-depth exam and he wants to see rested eyes when I show up.  He said only to look at things in the distance until then.

So, if you have not yet experienced this nemesis as a writer, take heed and simply pace yourself as much as possible.  Every 30 minutes, stop and look at something 30 feet away for 30 seconds.  Use moisturizing drops in your eyes often throughout the day and give yourself a day or two off from reading or writing.  You'll discover that to be a tremendous challenge, like I have.  I listen to music, meditate with CDs or lie down and just listen to something interesting on television. 

This truly is a slow torture for me and I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy, but a few minutes to prevent it is well worth the time you spend and it saves your vision in the long run.

Author of:  WE ARE DIFFERENT NOW
Blog:  www.jtzortman.wordpress.com
Facebook:  www.facebook.com/jtzortman.author.2013


Tuesday, October 14, 2014

If You See Me Crying in Public...

A good book is one that makes me laugh so hard, I embarrass myself on public transportation. I was sitting on an airplane when I read Laurie Notaro’s It Looked Better on the Model and was laughing so uncontrollably, I scared the poor young man sitting next to me.

“Are you okay” he asked, looking worried.

“It’s… just…so… funny!” I said, trying to stop myself from crying and convulsing.

I put the book down, wiped my face with a tissue and took a few deep breaths, trying to pull myself together. When I thought I had calmed down enough, I picked up the book and continued to read, determined to behave like a responsible adult. However, within ten seconds, I was doubled over in my seat again and laughing so hard, I risked having a hernia at 30,000 feet.

Word of advice: do not read anything by Bill Bryson or Dave Barry on an airplane, bus, or train unless you want to explain “happy tears” to strangers.

I also love sad books that make me cry. Travelers going through the San Antonio airport in May witnessed my complete undoing when I sat on a hard plastic seat and sobbed reading The Book Thief while waiting for my flight. Yes, it was a beautiful, earth-shattering book that will retain a special place in my heart and memory. No, I will not see the movie. My little Kleenex travel pack was barely sufficient to staunch the flow from every part of my face that could flow. I think the travelers in San Antonio suffered enough for everyone.

A GREAT book is one that can make me laugh and cry at the same time.  Even the saddest story instantly becomes more poignant and memorable to me when the author inserts twists of humor into the plot, description or dialogue.

Author John Green is a master at this. Few things are less funny than a story about star-crossed kids with cancer who fall in love. I bawled my eyes out reading The Fault in Our Stars. But I also laughed heartily and read over and over particular passages that highlighted Green’s mastery at pointing out the goofy irony of living, even for a teenager who’s dying. In fact, I couldn’t even get past the first 2 pages without bursting into laughter, picturing the kids in the Support Group sitting in the literal Heart of Jesus (located in a church basement) led by ball-less cancer survivor, Patrick, who was “eking out a meager living by exploiting his cancertastic past…”

Hilarious.

In literature, there’s a time for funny and a place for sad, but writers should always look for creative ways to combine them. Life is full of surprises. That’s why we love to read stories that aren’t what we expect. We love tough guys with soft hearts, nerds who kick a bully’s butt, bulldogs who ride skateboards, and crime-fighting grannies with superpowers. Readers love to laugh. And sometimes writers gift us with the ability to see a sad, hopeless situation in a very funny way. Those are the stories that live in our hearts forever.

Just make sure you have more than one Kleenex travel pack when you read them.


Ann K. Howley is the author of Confessions of a Do-Gooder Gone Bad, released by Oak Tree Press in 2014. May cause happy tears.

Sunday, October 12, 2014

The Muse is on Vacation


While one on-line source identifies Erato as the muse of erotic poetry and Kleio, the muse of history, I have never been quite sure which one supports my writing.  While I tend to lean towards the erotic poetry keeper of the flame of my contributions, I can't dismiss Kleio out-of-hand either.  Now, if there was a muse for erotic history I might be able to find a home there.  Whoever she is, or in whatever form she takes with my output, my Muse is on vacation.  I do not have writer's block.  I have plenty of ideas, threads, conversations, characters and plot lines to last me for some time. It's just that my Muse is off somewhere gallivanting with satyrs and other beasts of the forest.

Everyone deserves a vacation, now and then, and I am convinced, without question, that writers also need to take a break from their laptops and legal pads.  Someone, wise and wonderful, once opined that we need to take time to stop and smell the roses. Okay, as I write this, I'm making the rounds of rose gardens, baseball games, summer theater, and curb-side stands where lemonade is sold for a quarter by the neighborhood cute-kids.

It won't be long now before I start sharpening my pencils and putting my fingers to the keyboard. And then, all will be well with my corner of the world and my Muse(s) will again be lolling behind me whispering into my ears. But for now, there's another rose to smell and I don't have to think of words to describe how it affects my senses.


Gary Best
Author of Tink's Tank coming soon from Oak Tree Press

Friday, October 10, 2014

WEEKLY ROUND-UP FOR OCTOBER 10, 2014

Welcome to the Weekly Round-Up everyone! Thank you for dropping in. Oak Tree Press has lots of news in our corral today. Be sure to check out our website, www.ShopOTPbooks.com, for a complete list of all the great books we have available. But now, for your reading pleasure, our authors have news, book signings, events, reviews, blogs and more to share with you as we head into the Round-Up…







The time is here for the Taste the Arts Festival in downtown Visalia, CA. 
Tomorrow, Saturday, October 11, join BILLIE JOHNSON, OTP Publisher and OTP author MARILYN MEREDITH at the festival. 

Come and see all the great creative work in the Central Valley and visit OTP's booth while you are there. There are over 60 artists displaying their work and two entertainment stages. Check out a food sculpture contest as well as a floral arrangement contest. A hair and fashion show will be held from 6:00 - 8:00 pm. Check the following link for a complete list of activities TastetheArts.net



BILLIE has prepared a test run of OTP titles in her new tabletop display rack. And the standing display rotates and holds 32 titles!   https://www.facebook.com/TasteTheArts








________________________________________

JEANA LOMPREZ, OTP Public Relations Manager, has hooked up with Manic Readers to spotlight several OTP books. These sample chapters will be updated frequently and new releases will also be featured. 
Need help choosing a great book to read? Check out our sample chapters we have plenty to choose from.... Click on the title and you will be directed to a free read!
________________________________________

OTP is proud to announce a new title hitting the shelves this week:

"Jingo Street"
by SHARON ERVIN

Max Marco, 36, murdered his first man when he was eight years old. New attorney Anne Krease, 24, grew up sheltered like a hothouse orchid. When naive Anne meets the semiretired “enforcer,” the chemistry between them is magnetic. Complete at 93,000 words, JINGO STREET is a love story, not a romance. It has an inevitable ending, not a happily ever-after one.

Amazon reviewer Mike Sherer said, “...I love the writer’s style here and the writing itself is engaging....”

Retired newspaper editor Jane Bryant said, “I have read all eleven of Sharon Ervin’s published novels, and JINGO STREET is my favorite. The characters are enchanting, the plot spell-bindiing, and the ending completely unexpected.”
__________________________________________

The following title is due out in just a few short days:

"Malignancy"
by "J. L. GREGER

This is the fourth book in GREGER’s medical mystery series after “Coming Flu,” “Murder: A New Way to Lose Weight,”and “Ignore the Pain.”

In “Malignancy,” men disguised as police officers shoot at Sara Almquist twice in one day. The real police suspect Jim Mazzone, a drug czar currently awaiting trial in Albuquerque, will order more hits on Sara. After all, Sara was the key to Mazzone’s capture in Bolivia while she was consulting on public health problems there. Thus when colleagues in the State Department invite Sara to arrange scientific exchanges between the U.S. and Cuba, she jumps at the chance to get out of Albuquerque. Maybe, she should question their motives.
__________________________________________


UPCOMING EVENTS


MARY MONTAGUE SIKES, author of "Jungle Jeopardy" is one of two visiting artists at New Town Art Gallery in Williamsburg, VA. During September, October and November, she will display her novels and the coffee table book, “Hotels to Remember,” in addition to her paintings. http://www.newtownartgallery.com/galleryevents/index.htm







BERYL REICHENBERG, OTP children's book author, will have several book forms on display in a group show at the Paso Robles Library on October 2 running through the end of October. Her art piece, Hanging Book 3, continues to be displayed at the San Luis Obispo Museum of Art until the middle of October. 

BERYL will be holding her final enrichment class at Almond Acres Charter School in San Miguel this week. She says… "we'll focus on a Halloween book this week. I'm delighted with how well the children have done over the past four weeks making their books. They are talented youngsters. I'll be meeting with school staff to arrange visits to individual classrooms during the year to talk about writing and publishing stories."


RADINE TREES NEHRING, author of “A Fair to Die For,” will be signing books at the Ozark Creative Writers Conference in Eureka Springs, AR (where another of her novels is set) on October 9-11 in the Best Western Inn of the Ozarks and Conference Center. http://www.ozarkcreativewriters.com.






D. R. RANSDELL, author of “Mariachi Murder” and “Island Casualty” will be at the Old Pueblo Grill in Tucson, AZ on October 11 from noon – 2:00 pm presenting a grammar workshop. http://tinyurl.com/nbtsjnl









TEKLA DENNISON MILLER, author of “Mother Rabbit,”  along with ALYCE BONURA who the memoir was written about, will present and sign books at the Westwood Public Library, 1246 Glenwood Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 310-474-1739 on October 11 at 2:00 pm.

Then on October 13, TEKLA and ALYCE will be at the Burbank Central Library auditorium, 110 North Glenoaks Blvd., Burbank CA 818-238-5562 starting at 7:00 pm. 

On October 16, Lucy Walton of Female First Magazine will post TEKLA’s interview about Mother Rabbit.”
  
On October 30 at 7:00 pm, TEKLA will be a member of a 3 person panel presenting for the Life Long Learning Lecture Series at Fort Lewis College, Durango CO. They will explore artworks inspired by Sr. Helen Prejean’s book Dead Man Walking.  Panelists include Charissa Chiaravalotti, director of choral studies, and Dennis Elkins, chair of the FLC Theater Department. TEKLA will comment on the film, and journalist and music critic Judith Reynolds, will chair the panel and focus on the opera.

On November 12, TEKLA will be the guest author at the TWRAHS book group reviewing “Mother Rabbit.” The event will be hosted by Connie Jacobs, Durango, CO


THONIE HEVRON, author of “Intent to Hold” has received an invitation for a radio interview at KOWS 107.3FM, (streaming at www.kcrb.org) in Occidental, CA. She will be talking to Suzanne M. Lang of Lit Radio and will be reading from her book on Sunday, October 12 at 7:00 pm.

Looking forward to November 11, THONIE will be speaking to the Rohnert Park Rotary about the Writers Life.





ANN K. HOWLEY, author of “Confessions of a Do-Gooder Gone Bad” will be signing books on October 16 at the Authors' Zone Pittsburgh Book Awards Ceremony at the Rivers Club in downtown Pittsburgh. The event starts at 5:30 pm.

On November 6, ANN will be the featured speaker for the Peters Township Referrals group at their event at the Sharp Edge Brasserie in McMurray, PA at 5:00 pm. Her presentation is called "Write a Memoir - and Try Not to Laugh." She will also be selling and signing books at this event.



AMY BENNETT, author of “End of the Road” and “No Lifeguard on Duty” will be at the Open House for the Alamogordo Public Library (Alamogordo, NM) on October 18 at 1:00 pm where she will be giving a book talk and signing her books. And just brought to my attention is that AMY’s books have gotten 29 Five-Star Reviews on amazon.com! Wow!







MARILYN MEREDITH, author of “Murder in the Worst Degree” will be at the Great Valley Bookfest on Saturday October 18 from 10:00 – 4:00 pm. The Bookfest is located at the Orchard Valley Shopping Center in Mateca, CA. MARILYN will be on Stage A at 2:00 pm talking about writing two mystery series.

On Saturday, October 25, from 1:00 – 4:00 pm, MARILYN will be participating with the Central Coast Sisters in Crime on a panel about the age of E-Publishing at the Atascadero Library in Atascadero.


VIRGIL ALEXANDER, author of “Saints and Sinners” will be signing books at the Bullion Plaza Museum in Miami, AZ during the Miami High School Class of '64 fiftieth reunion on Sunday, October 19. Note the new time of  10:00 - 12:00 noon.







JOHN M. WILLS, author of “The Year Without Christmas” will be signing copies of his books at the St. Matthew Catholic Church in Spotsylvania, VA on October 19 from noon – 3:00 pm. 

The Year Without Christmas” has been selected as the November book of the month by the St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception parish book club.

On Monday, November 17th, at 10:00 am, JOHN will be the guest speaker at the monthly meeting of the Council of Catholic Women held at St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception parish in Fredericksburg, VA.


KEN OXMAN, author of “Reluctant Assassin” will have a book signing at Barret Bookstore in Darien, CT on November 29. In December, Barnes & Noble in Norwalk, CT will have KEN come and speak at their Christmas Book Fair.  Ken is pictured here at his book signing at Barnes and Noble.







BLOG CORRAL


LORNA COLLINS, author of “Ghost Writer” completes her report on her 50th high school reunion with some special “snapshots” of special memories from the weekend. http://lornacollins-author.blogspot.com/









DAC CROSSLEY, author of the "Guns of the Texas Ranger" the first book in his Border Trilogy, sends everyone a good wishes and shares an October entry on Dac’s Western Blog:  The Secrets of Sam Houston. www.daccrossley.typepad.com.

And check out DAC’s web page, daccrossley.com, recently revised by webmaster Janice Sand. Let him know what you think.





JOANN SMITH AINSWORTH, author of “Expect Trouble” had three blogging dates this week. Catch her at the following links:

10/6/14 - Goodreads.com "Ask an Author" Mondays
10/8/14 - The Edible Bookshelf Author Interview
10/9/14 - Tempting Romance Facebook Page guest blogger






SHARON ARTHUR MOORE, author of the culinary mystery, “Mission Impastable” has several blogging events to share this week.

In "NaNoWriMo is NOT a Cuddly Stuffed Animal" SHARON explains why not all who start NaNoWriMo finish. http://writeonsisters.com/writers-life/nanowrimo-is-not-a-cuddly-stuffed-animal/

"My 9-Step Planning Process for NaNoWriMo: I’m In. Are You?" In this post, SHARON shares her planning strategy and then asks readers to vote for one of four story ideas. The winner will be announced in November for National Novel Writing Month.  http://writeonsisters.com/writing-craft/my-9-step-planning-process-for-nanowrimo-im-in-are-you/

"What It Takes to be a Novelist" talks about why some don't think they can write. http://angelicafrench.blogspot.com/2014/09/what-it-takes-to-be-novelist.html

"The Quick Cook Makes Cookies" in a time-saving way http://sharonarthurmoore.blogspot.com/2014/09/the-quick-cook-makes-cookies.html

"Completing a Novel" can be daunting. Not many who start, finish the job. http://angelicafrench.blogspot.com/2014/10/completing-novel.html

In "A Month of Starters" SHARON shows that coming up with story ideas is no problem with the “What If” and “How Come” games to use on 31 story starters. http://sharonarthurmoore.blogspot.com/2014/10/a-month-of-starters.html


That wraps up the Round-Up for this week. I hope everyone enjoys the Weekly Round-Up as much as I enjoy posting it for you. 

As always, if you have something you would like to submit to the Round-Up, send me an email at otpoffice@aol.com. 

Big or small, old or new. I would like to keep our corral full of news! Comments, questions or suggestions are welcome too.

Have a great weekend, everyone.~ Suzi 

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