Tuesday, April 5, 2011

Steady Writing

by Jean Henry Mead

When I sat down to write this morning, I thought of a long ago interview with bestselling romance novelist Parris Afton Bonds for my book, Maverick Writers. Bonds emphasized the need to write every day. The mother of five lively sons, she wrote between diaper changes as well as on the job, which cost her several secretarial positions before she decided to write full time.

“I write when I’m sick,” she said, “and even as I shove that turkey into the oven on Thanksgiving and Christmas. There are no legal holidays for [professional] writers.”

A steady writing schedule is one of the most important aspects of publishing one’s work. Whether you rise two hours early to write before leaving for your day job, or at night before you go to bed, it needs to be done at least five days a week. Women with small children can schedule their writing time when the young ones are down for a nap, if only for an hour, but the same hour each day until it becomes a habit. But if you only have a few minutes now and then, use that time to jot down notes or bits of dialogue as the late Don Coldsmith did on the backs of prescription pads during his daily medical  practice.

Mystery novelist Marlys Millhiser echoed Parris Bond’s work ethic. She begins writing at 10:00 a.m. and continues until 4:00 in the afternoons. Both writers stress the fact that you must stay at the computer (or note pad) no matter how difficult the writing is going that day.

"My first draft is pretty bad,” Millhiser said. “But no matter how difficult it is, I hang in there. Sometimes you have to backtrack and begin again, but don’t stop to polish a chapter until the first draft is finished. When I’m on a run and the plot floats along, the characters take over and it’s wonderful. But most of the time, I’m just sitting there and sweating it out. And I’ve found, I’m sorry to say, that the stuff I sweated out and got three pages by working my pants off, was about the same quality as when the story just flowed along and I’ve gotten ten pages.”

Brian Garfield, author of “Death Wish” and countless other novels and screenplays, said, “I took up writing partly because some of the stuff that was published seemed so awful and so easy to do, and of course it isn’t easy to do, as you find out when you sit down to try to do it. And it took a long time—a lot of apprenticeship practice before I could write anything that was worth publishing. But you don’t know that until you try. At the time of the interview, he wrote five hours a day, from 8:00 a.m. until 1:00 p.m. No longer because of back problems.

Set your pace and before long you’ll feel that you must write during those hours. It becomes as important to those who want to succeed as breathing.

I'm at my computer by eight in the morning, with few exceptions, and write until three or later in the afternoon. A half hour treadmill break gives me a chance to loosen up and recharge my brain cells. Then I may have another go at it again until it's time to prepare dinner, and sometimes until bedtime, because writing is what I love doing most of all.

4 comments:

Marilyn Meredith a.k.a. F. M. Meredith said...

Hi, Jean, I agree. If you really want to be a writer, you write. I don't write on Sunday's usually, but I write the rest of the days unless I'm out of town, but I usually bring along some writing related work.

Jean Henry Mead said...

I'm afraid that my life revolves around writing, whether tapping the computer keys or research and pleasure reading. I think to succeed you have to dedicate your life to the various aspects of writing. And it takes a special person to marry one of us. :)

WS Gager said...

Jean: Dedication and a schedule to writing is the key to getting a book finished. I have at least three-rounds and many of them are a fight. I have found that the first draft must just flow out--the good, bad and ugly. The second round is getting the beginning to work with the end and trying to fill all the plot holes. Getting it pretty is the editing process for the last round that never ends.
Wendy

Helen Ginger said...

I don't have a set schedule, but I do write everyday - or edit what I've written.