Sunday, April 22, 2012

Travel for Inspiration

"Canyon Light" Copyright MMSikes
As author of the Passenger to Paradise book series, I love to travel and to discover new places that inspire both my fiction and my non-fiction writing. While in Sedona AZ earlier this month, I learned about a place I had not visited. Actually, I had not even known about its existence until I overheard a conversation about it in a restaurant. I'm sure I noticed a spectacular photo that our guide through Antelope Canyon later told us was on the cover of National Geographic magazine one month, but I didn't connect it with Arizona.

Thinking we would visit the Grand Canyon once again along with this new canyon we'd discovered, we headed north from Sedona. It was a three-hour journey to Page, located on the edge of Lake Powell and almost into the state of Utah. Antelope Canyon, both Upper and Lower, was about three miles from Page and on the Navajo Indian Reservation.

The first thing we spotted as we began the tour was a plaque remembering the tour group that died in 1998 when a flash flood struck the canyon, and the visitors could not get out before drowning in the rising waters. Most of the tourists were from Europe. The tour guide was the only person to escape, according to our guide.

Now, I can see all sorts of stories developing from that tragedy. How was it that the guide escaped and the others did not? Did he feel any guilt or remorse because of what happened?

This canyon journey was more intense and far more beautiful than we expected. We never made it to the Grand Canyon that day.

How does travel influence your writing? Or does it?

Monti

12 comments:

William Doonan said...

Travel makes you a storyteller. My Henry Grave mystery series, featuring an octogenarian who solves crimes on cruise ships, was inspired by actual cruises I worked on.

William Doonan
www.themummiesofblogspace9.com

Marilyn Meredith a.k.a. F. M. Meredith said...

Traveling can give you a different perspective on what you're writing--and it also will give you the opportunity to observe new people who just might end up in our next book--in one form or another.

Kathy said...

Travelling influences my photography, for sure. It broadens your thought on just about anything. Your photo of the canyon is wonderful!!!
Kathy at Oak Lawn Images

Shalanna said...

Travel is just the ticket (ha) for coming up with new scenarios and ideas for your books. My MARFA LIGHTS mystery series takes my sleuthing sisters to Sedona, among other "woo-woo" places, to solve paranormal mysteries. If they just stayed here in Dallas, there'd be nothing much after figuring out the Lady of the Lake at White Rock. We don't have any famous vortices or haunted mansions.

Monti said...

William, what a great idea for a series, and, of course, you must have material to go on forever!

Monti said...

You are always aware, Marilyn. Wonderful to observe as you travel!

Monti said...

Kathy, thank you! The canyon scenery was amazing, a photo at every turn.

Monti said...

Shalanna, travel is perfect for gathering new ideas! My novel, Eagle Rising, is set in Sedona also. It's a paranormal based on some events that actually happened in Sedona! Thanks for commenting!

Patricia Gligor said...

I feel the same way. I love to travel to new places and to see things I've never seen before I always come back from a trip better off than when I left, refreshed and ready to write. And, sometimes, with new ideas of things to write about.

Ternce said...

Travelling should be a dream of almost everyone. Thanks for sharing this awesome post.

essay said...

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Beryl Reichenberg said...

I also enjoy travel and have traveled extensively all over the world. This experience has given me many ideas for my children's books and photographs to use for illustrations. While I was in East Africa, I took many photographs of African animals which formed the basis for a series of books on these animals: Zebras, Camels, Hippos, Giraffes, and many more. I also visited a small village which became the starting point for a story about a small boy named Zuberi who takes his first trip with his father to market in a much bigger town. Detailing all the new things he saw and the contrasts between his tiny village and the larger town, this book gives small children visual and written information about how people live in East Africa. I've also written other story for children about the Maasai and a small boy living in Japan. I find that young children particularly enjoy learning about the world around them.